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energy has been to develop a software strategy. a strategy that galvanizes regional publics, galvanizes these publics most intensely of grievances, including grievances against the united states and israel and most importantly against their own unrepresentative pro-western government in regime. amendment the islamic republic has done is aligned itself with public opinion at south in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking a. just think about how barbering largely shia population would react to the fleetest our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that the iran's population would be passive as they think they assumed maybe even five years ago. but today it clearly seems reckless. for other ridiculing many american policy elites do with the islamic republic, the appeal to regional public actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative pro-western neighboring iran. iran is also the two reinforce these aspects of a software strategy of a number of years at picking wh
not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-sufficient producer -- i am glad you said north american energy independent. i always disliked the idea of this national energy independence. if you become energy self- sufficient, you eliminate half the trade deficit. this really changes the balance of payments and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all ar
and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will belong and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must leave it. we cannot cede this, must climates prague -- its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national parks, forests, waterways, snowcapped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care. that is what will lend meaning to the creek our fathers once declared. >> there was a lot of time spent on climate change. was that a surprise? guest: i think people expected climate change to get a shout out along with immigration, gun control the environment of trinity was really been very surprised challenge mentioning god. it got a huge and a huge chunk of time, almost more than any other policy issues. that was a real surprise. host: it was an issue we did not hear a lot about on the campaign .rail paria guest: that was by design. his advisers have made it clear that they did not see that as winning -- as a winning campaign issue. although it is something the president did care about, it
of energy, does a possibility of a two-pillar solution using both saudi arabia and iran for security in the middle east exist, and that's possible -- if that's possible, does a potential expansion of u.s. domestic energy production open a door to a numbering solution? -- to a energy solution? thank you. >> i think the notion of a proxy war, i think i understand what you're saying. i think i'd use a different vocabulary from that. and this gets into the issue of the relationship with saudi arabia. what's going on right now in the middle east is that saudi arabia, as it has done at any number of points in its, in its modern history, is basically using the promotion of a particular sort of salafi islam. we tend to call it knew has been by islam in the u.s. although saudis don't really like that term. but this very particular notion of salafi islam, the kind of salafi islam we see embodied in, say, the taliban, saudi arabia actively promotes this kind of islam as a tool of its foreign policy. and, you know, under current circumstances in the region saudi efforts to do that are escalating
, which i mentioned earlier, but also renewable energies, greece has this capable due to the geographic call division. we can also look at quality agricultural products. it's another capability that greece has. we can look at energy on the whole. today greece is an energy hump. the inroads of the energy and roads of the 12st century run through greece today pane research, innovation, utilizing the country's scientific dynamic and potential. there's so many children that are heading out to other countries today. greece can return to the road of growth if it can overcome its endemic. weaknesses and with the help of all of those who not want to take advantage of grows but truly want to help it and stablize itself in europe. >> thank you very much. just a quick followup question, if you allow me. the national agenda is that you are in -- [inaudible] in washington last month you were in brazil. and emerging economy which has been growing quite faster together with other emerging economies especially in egypt and and indonesia. and these emerging economies have been also growing so fast -- [i
obama is making a moral case on the issue of climate. do you see energy issues, climate issues, being tackled in this next congress? a realistic goal? guest: energy policy broadly absolutely has to be part of the discussion. climate change -- after the severe storms with sandy recently and other harbour tragedies, i think the science is definitely confirming the fact that climate change exists and that we have to do things more responsible about it. my focus is on renewable energy. we don't have oil companies in nevada, but what we do have is an abundance of wind, solar, and geothermal. and i believe that those are alternatives that should be part of our overall energy mix to make us less reliance on fossil fuels and more energy independent in the long term. host: philadelphia, pennsylvania. our next caller is richard, independent line. caller: how are you doing? how are you doing, congressman? the question -- a couple of thoughts. i am interested in what puc is the area that productivity will occur. as far as when you talk about job creation and you coming from nevada, looking at the
. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and industry. we must claim its promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national presence of forests and waterways, snow-capped peaks, crop lands. and how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. host: the wall street journal on climate change has this. in flushing, new york, an independent. how are you? caller: good morning. i liked his speech, because it was different from the last one, because it concentrated on how to make america a better country rather than being the military police for the world. he was tempted to talk about north africa and al qaeda and all these things, but he wants to make america stronger. cost is too much. america is not respected, even spending all this money. how to make america big and strong, how to teach our kids, how to respect peop
is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury with agriculture -- atta boy -- ag does and the treasury department does, and i think there is much more that we can do to augment our engagement in the private sector and their desires and needs abroad. i will give you an example. when i was in hong kong and number of years ago i met with our commercial service people. we had three of them. three people in hong kong. and they said they were overwhelmed. they had no ability to be given to mary rfp from china cummins writ with other countries. france was there, germany, england, others were much more aggressive in their promotion of their companies. and that is the world we are living in today. so i think we have to be much more aggressive in that respect. it's not an expenditu
. >> thank you for coming. for more than 30 years they served our country. during the energy natural resources committee a though. we are continuing to spend almost $400 billion a year to buy oil. and your colleague, senator lugar for a long time has told us the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and is sponsored and open feel standard to make a competitive market to move automobiles of drugs, whether it's not banal or whatever to have a market so when you drive a to the pump you have a choice in the price goes down. what do you think? do you think that's a good idea? at your colleague on, he saw stuart country. with a competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> the technology developments and fracturing has become that competitive instrument that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that is going to put this in a completely different position than in the past. i don't think we need to -- we see me after to develop the sources of energy. they can't be competitive because of the new discoveries of oil and gas through shale that is a tot
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at limited resources. climate change is a big issue you have been concerned on. the global energy needs are going to increase about 50%, that emissions are going to go up significantly primarily because of china and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this.
material cost in the world and lowest energy costs in the world. let's look at how we could make this product back here in america. >> and today the swing once again is made in the usa. just a few years ago when the economy tanked little tykes considered moving manufacturing elsewhere but ultimately they decided to stay receiving close to $4 million in tax incentives for the government. >> we appreciate the state of the federal government but honestly it's not enough to make the difference. it's about the people, it's about the productivity, it's about the longevity. >> they make a large assortment of toys. >> everything little tykes does emulating what parents do in the real world. >> that's why moms are a big part of the research. today they are giving suggestions for the redesign of the cozy coup. >> to use by themselves they can just get in it and walk along. >> i love the floorboards. >> i think toddlers are drawned to the kind of cartoony look that it has. the colors are the iconic thing. >> bye bye. >> more on that on fox and friends later today at 6:30. >> they are adorab
-policy is defined by food security, energy security, he monetary assistance, the fight against disease and the push for development. as much as it is by any single counterterrorism initiative. new mexico must be. it is defined by leadership -- and it must be. it is defined by leadership. speaking out for the prisoners in north korea or millions of refugees in displaced persons or victims of human trafficking. it is defined by keeping faith with all of our troops who sacrificed to secure afghanistan. america lives up to her values when we give voice to the voiceless. i share with the president the conviction that it is equally imperative that we assert a new role in the world of increasing failed and failing states. burgeoning populations of young people hungry for jobs, opportunity, individual rights, and freedom are rebelling against years of disenfranchisement and humiliation. a fruit vendor in tunisia who ignited the arab awakening want to dignity and respect. he wanted to sell his fruit without corruption and abuse. that is what led him to itself in the late. the youth of tehrir square represen
that with the consent of the senate, i will do everything in my power, summon all my energy and focus to build on her record and on the president's vision. senator mccain, as he mentioned, is a longtime friend. we met here in the senate coming from very different political positions and perspectives, but, you know, we found common ground. i will never forget standing with him in hanoai, in the cell which he spent many years of his life listening to him talk about that experience. i will always be grateful for his partnership in helping to make real peace with vietnam by establishing the most significant process in the history of our country or in any country, for the accounting of missing and dead in any war. and then for working to lift the embargo and ultimately normalize relations with an old enemy. john had every reason to hate, but he didn't and instead we were able to help heal deep wounds and end the war that had divided too many people for much too long. as we talk about war and peace and foreign policy, i want all of us to keep in our minds, as i think we do, the extraordinary men and women
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
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. >> reporter: fumihiro ito spent years developing energy sources. he led a project to develop gas fields in the salaha desert. he came from a town devastated in the tsunami two years ago. now, his 82-year-old mother lives alone in temporary housing. she says she has no mementos to remember her son. he and his former classmates were planning to get together next month to celebrate their 60th birthdays. >> translator: ito said he would join the party but would not stay overnight, because he wanted to visit his mother and stay with her. i want the news to be a mistake. i still think ito will show up at the party. >> reporter: he was looking forward to seeing his old friend. instead, he and the others will take a moment to remember. keiko abe, nhk world, tokyo. >> seven survivors of the attack will fly home on a government plane. the bodies of the seven victims will also be on the plane. >>> survivors from other asian countries have started to return patchari raksawong has details. >> a malaysian man arrived home on wednesday afternoon. he was an employee of the engineering firm, jgc. ravi k
. >>> algerian government officials have reassured foreign energy companies they'll deal aggressively with terrorism. they've confirmed that 37 foreign hostages died during a standoff at a gas complex in the sahara desert. they say militants were making wild demands, so security forces were compelled to act. nhk world has the details. >> reporter: oil company executives see riches beneath these sands but they're questioning the cost of their investment after what happened here. >> translator: the terrorists entered the country from northern mali. they were trying to take the foreign hostages and flee. >> reporter: sellal said the victims were from at least eight countries. government officials from japan, the philippines, britain and the u.s. say workers from their countries were among those killed. an islamist group claimed responsibility for the attack. the group leader, it's reported to be a former member of an organization known as al qaeda in islamic megreb. sellal said the militants started blowing up part of the facilities, so security forces had to move in. >> translator: we c
in algeria. he had spent years developing energy resources. he led a project to develop gas fields in the desert. ito came from minamiransiku, a town devastated in the tsunami two years ago. now his 82-year mother lives alone in temporary housing. she says she has no mementos to remember her son. he and his former classmates were planning to get together next month to celebrate their 60th birthdays. >> translator: ito said he would join the party but would not stay overnight because he wanted to visit his mother and stay with her. i want the news to be a mistake. i still think ito will show up at the party. >> reporter: he was looking forward to seeing his old friend. instead, he and the others will take a moment to remember. keiko abe, nhk world, tokyo. >> seven survivors of the attack will fly home on a government plane. the bodies of the seven victims will also be on the plane. >>> a businesswoman in japan is trying to solve a problem in a place that has no shortage of them. the aftermad of the 2011 tsunami left construction crews in the northeast with plenty to do but few place
they'll use it for somewhat of an anefarious even atomic energy. is that a moral concern? >> i think so. i used to fly f-18 for the navy, flying it ten years ago was difficult because it was me talking to one other person on the radio making the decisions under stress over a target. today we have drones and other people on the ground and they are talking to each other. they are talking to the air traffic control plane in the sky. they are talking to people at the pentagon, for example, so we've got a lot more people talking in real-time. so i think drone warfare is say safer, more effective form of warfare. less collateral damage and press blue on blue kills which is when we kill our own people. >> jon: what about a death star? >> i signed that petition. >> jon: did you really? why didn't you sign that petition? [ laughter ] when you think about it if you say it's sort of an easier technology, is that the kind of thing where -- you know, i always -- listen, i watch a lot of movies. anything like the clone armies, drones -- all those types of things. you see 30 years from now there may b
of the above energy strategy that could create jobs. after nebraska for dave heineman revealed he approved revived route for the keystone xl oil and gas pipeline to avoid environmentally sensitive areas of his state from canada to texas. last year, the white house repeatedly fell back on the for's initial opposition to justify delaying the pipeline. >> we only originally delayed the process because in part of concerns raised about the original pipeline route, by the for of nebraska. concern by folks in nebraska including the republican for about the original proposed route. >> after the for's decision today, the white house punted back to the state department, still reviewing the application. >> i don't want to get ahead of the process. the state department has something to move forward on. we'll address that issue, and when it does. >> the president of the american fuel and petro chemical manufacturers association declared now is the president's chance to prove to the nation his all of the above energy strategy is more than forgotten campaign rhetoric. executive director of the sierra clu
long-term economic vitality by ensuring we make investments in new energy technology and that we develop new storms of energy as well as -- forms of energy as well as traditional forms of energy here at home so we are less dependent on foreign imports of energy. that's a strategy that enhances our national security, improves the environment, addresses climate change and the very important -- and very importantly helps our economy by allowing industries to develop here in the united states, that this if they don't develop here will develop elsewhere. industries that provide good jobs and will be very sustainable in the future. >> those who look at this issue say dealing with existing power plants would be the best way, most effective way to reduce carbon emissions and advance what the president said in the inaugural. does he agree with that? >> i'm not going to talk about -- >> philosophically. >> philosophically is aned a verb that is somewhat synonymous with speck latively and i will, you know, not speculate on future -- >> [inaudible] inaugural address and those who look at thi
for coming. more than 30 years of service. the energy and natural resources committee, we are continuing to san $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil. your colleague senator lugar for a long time told us the only way to beat a cartel, sponsored open fuel standard, basically make a competitive market, the move, automobiles, trucks, weather is electricity or methanol or ethanol or whenever to have a market so that like brazil when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down. do you think that is a good idea? with your colleague gone now a huge loss to our country. would you be supportive of a competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> in fracturing that competitive instrument, that is causing that to happen. we had a great fortune of this technology to break through that is going to put this in a completely different position than we have been in the past so i don't think we need -- we have seen the effort to try to develop alternative competitive sources of energy. the problem is they can't be competitive, and particularly because of the new discovery of oil and
developments in the energy industry could lead to high-paying jobs if the government could get out of the way. >>gretchen: varney, a disclaimer here. sorry he put your daughter into that story. secondly, you can always tell when brian has not slept a lot because he actually has more energy. if we do a study on energy -- >>brian: if i would be powered, it would be by natural gas and that could be the future of our country. >> there's a segue. first of all, let's deal with the pipeline. 53 senators including 9 democrats write a letter to the president saying we want that keystone pipeline. please approve it, mr. president. second item, chesapeake energy, huge natural gas producer, opens up a well, one of these fracking wells. opens it up totally to the e.p.a. come on in. have a look at what we're doing and have a look at the aftermath of what we're doing. and if you can find any kind of pollution, okay, we'll hear about it. those are two huge steps forward toward producing a lot more oil, a lot more natural gas, energy independence, jobs in america, a huge step forward in the government gets ou
're on the energy and resources committee also, we are continuing to send almost $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil, and your colleague senator lugar, for a long time has told us that the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and he sponsored what is called an open-fuel standard. to basically make a competitive market to move automobiles, trucks, whether it's electricity or ethanol or whatever, to have a market so that brazil, when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down, we think. do you think that's a good idea? and with your colleague gone now and the loss to our country would you be support i have of the competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> i think the technology developments and -- has become that competitive. that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that breakthrough take is going to put us in a different position than we've been in the past. i don't think -- we have seen the effort to try to determine and development alternative competitive because the discovery of oil and gas through shale and shale and thr
to committing all of my energies to working with the other commissioners and extremely talented and dedicated men and women of the staff of the sec, to fulfill the agencies mission to protect investors and ensure the strength, efficiency, and transparency of our capital markets. the sec, long a vital and positive force for our markets, has a lot of hard and important work ahead of it. i would welcome the opportunity to lead those efforts and build on the work of chairman mary schapiro and chairman elisse walter, who i am very honored is present today. finally and most importantly, i want to thank my husband, who is here today on what is our 43rd wedding anniversary -- >> today? >> today -- for his strong support of me in seeking to engage this public service. thank you very much. >> thank you. richard. >> thank you, mr. president, for the confidence you have placed in me and the team at the consumer financial protection bureau. we understand that our mission is to stand on the side of consumers -- our mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers, sons and daughters -- and see that they are treat
a different position than the administration does. i want to see energy resources developed in this country. to me this is an absolute no brainer. i know the environmental community wants to stop this because they he want to stop using oil and petrochemicals. the fact is not doing this pipeline is not going to affect that at all. this material, this oil is going to go to china if we don't put it into a pipeline and bring it in to america and tuesday to create jobs here in america and lower the cost of energy here in the united states. >> shannon: and the president walking a bit of a tight rope calls from environmentalists but calls from union members who want to see the pipeline approved. how do you think he will find that delicate balance and make a decision? >> it is hard to say except if you look at what he did last time he had to make the call sided not with the unions but with the environmentalists and i think he is wrong on that. the unions are absolutely right. this is job creation, pure unanswered questions adulterated job creation that will really help america's use of its natural
beginning to look at the total cost, not just labor costs, but transportation costs, energy costs, political risk costs, all those type of things and they are realizing, hey, maybe manufacturing in the united states isn't so bad after all, and so actually small and mid-cap industrial companies and manufacturing companies, the stocks are doing exceptionally well, and nobody cares. that -- >> anything to stay away from, rich? >> i'd personally stay away from the emerging markets. everybody loves emerging markets. just had massive inflows and record inflows into emerging markets. many of the major emerging markets are caught between inflation and growth. i don't know if anybody saw wholesale food prices in china this morning. they came out much higher than expected. that's exactly the next step here. they are starting to juice up growth and inflation is quickly coming back. that's the problem that you have in india, the problem you have in many of the emerging markets. >> brian, you were nodding your head in agreement he said avoid. >> we tend to stick with the last dance parter too much and st
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus on reporting from the front lines and we begin with the secretary of state hillary clinton tomorrow. she is testifying finally about the attack on the american consulate in benghazi. now, officials tell us she will address concerns about weak security at u.s. diplomatic posts and will answer, quote, every question asked of her. among those questioning her, republican representative chris smith of the foreign relations committee. he tells "outfront" he wants to know if clinton was aware of the request for security upgrades at the consulate. we will speak to the congressman tomorrow to see if he is satisfied with the secretary's answer. >>> we have an "outfront" update on the artistic director of the bol
] what?! quattro!!!!! ♪ barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the cud lku report. i'm larry kudlow, in this half hour, the inaugural address was filled with his blueprint and no discussion of the connism aecon. later on, will phil mickle son leave california? quickly, my take away from the address yesterday, attempting to break ronald reagan's three decade long policies. i think the president had no entitlement reform or growth proposals and this talk of collectivism, it means that government is becoming the great equalizer. mr. obama seems to want equality of result and i think he's all wrong. let's talk about this. let's bring in art laffer and andrew codd. >> art, he didn't even hardly mention the economy. but you are an economist, how did you read this speech and what does
to be to the point where we can bring this debt under control, a sound financial policy, energy independence in a way we've never thought about before. we're respected by the world again like we haven't been for the last 20 years. >> so are you ready to run against hifrl clinton in 2016? >> look, i haven't made that judgment and hillary hasn't made that judgment but i can tell you what, everything that should be done over the next two years that i should be part of would have to be done whether i run or i don't run. if this administration is successful, whoever is running as a better position to run, if we are not successful, whoever runs as a nominee is going to be less likely to win. >> gloria is here with this excellent interview. i know more is coming up. but he's being pretty cagy. >> you saw him on that parade route shaking everyone's hand. he saw him at the iowa caucuses. have you heard of those? >> new hampshire, he was involved with them as well. >> exactly. he's 70, looks great, very energetic. if i had to guess, i would guess he's running. but as he said, he doesn't have to make that decis
that kind of energy. now we need to play ball. and how they play ball in the next few weeks and this window you talk about, joe, gives them the room they need to really drill down on a message, a core message. pretty much in line with what you're talking about, a fiscal conservative message about cutting the growth, the size, the spending that the government is currently engaged in to protect those very programs that the left is so hunkered down on and so concerned about for out year and for future generations. >> and the thing is, the president, if he wants to pass a sweeping bill on global warming, if he wants to go after cap and trade again, that's very easy. you can say if you're john boehner, well, that's fantastic. democrats, this is a democratic -- this is a democratic plan. you guys want it. it's a priority for you. guess what? you control the senate. you guys -- you guys pass global warming in the legislation in the senate, then we'll look at it in the house. gay marriage, fantastic. we are open to whatever you pass. that's your top priority, great. why don't you guys in the senate
, the gentleman given one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, there is good news about energy. we have untapped natural resources here at home. in the united states we have natural gas that can be turned into liquefies natural gas. other nations don't have this. we have so much natural gas that we can export it by selling it as l.n.g. not only will it bring money and energy back home, it will create jobs. this means jobs and capital for americans and american companies. even the department of energy says that expanded export of l.n.g. will benefit the united states' economy. in 2010, the oil and natural gas industry added $476 billion to our economy. to top it off, the oil and natural gas industry employs 9.2 million people in america. we are missing out on this opportunity by not exporting l.n.g. we have ignored this opportunity far too long. let's stop relying on middle eastern nations and use more natural gas and export it as l.n.g. that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> to add
other sub budgets and a permanent energy. domestically, we have a much higher unemployment rate in 1968. we have more poverty absolutely and relatively and 1968. we certainly have more home foreclosures and more consumer debt. of course, 30 million workers are making today less than the workers made in 1968 adjusted for inflation. that is why we're launching this national drive to overpower congress and split the republicans in congress, organized and what the democrats, so tens of billions of dollars are poured into the community, into the long deserved pockets of these people, many of whom have children and they don't have health insurance or paid sick leave or big vacations. but they deserve $10.50 minimum wage, which is what it would be in 1968. no big deal. >> explain how that would work, how does an increase in the minimum wage actually work? >> 1, congress can pass it for all of the states. there is no competition between the states that way in terms of wage levels, no competition between businesses, etc. everyone would have to pay the same minimum wage. the other way is what has
of this year's inauguration is "our people and our future" throughout my career what's always given me energy and inspiration and hope, what's allowed me to stand up when i've been knocked down are folks like you, the decency, the goodness, the resilience, the neighborliness, the patriotism, the sense of duty, sense of responsibility of the american people. you've inspired me throughout. so whenever i think about the challenges that joe and i and jill and michelle face, we know that we stand amongst friends, colleagues, fellow citizens. and that the work is not just ours, that we are working together. so i just want to say thank you. thank you very much. (applause) (cheers and applause) >> and i p want all of you to know even as we celebrate over the next couple days, feel free to stay up as late as you want. tomorrow is not a school night. make sure to bundle up, although it won't be as cold as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, but what we are doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredibl
schools fail too many and each day brings further evidence that the way we use energy strengthens our a adversarie adversaries. >> in light of where we stand today. >> the president says there is a spending probl is-- the spending problem before he came into office, roughly 2.5 trillion in revenues, and about 2.9, just less than 2.9. 2.8 trillion in spending. today revenues have recovered so that this year they'll be at 2.9 trillion. they're over 300 billion dollars from where they were when he came into office, but spending has gone up to 3.5 1/2 trillion dollars. you know, the revenues have recovered, but the spending has far outpaced it and he's not willing to make the hard choices and the amazing thing is, it was his own commission, a bipartisan commission, erskine bowles and senator simpson, simpson-bowles commission with recommendations on tough choices that needed to be made to rein in the future growth of entitlement spending and he rejected that today in the speech explicitly. >> sean: let me go back, this is personal for you, obviously, serving with president bush as long as
. that shows the impact of this. but around the north east, the department of energy has warned because of declining production in canada of natural gas and the inability to get the cheap fracking gas to the northeast, northeast bills are absolutely going to soar, hitting the highest level since 2008. >> neil: driven by the weather or more than that? >> no, i think it's really the weather, right now. if you look at the volatility of the natural gas prices in the northeast, and the inability to get natural gas where it needs to be, you are seeing extreme volatility, not only in the prices of natural gas, but for electricity and other uses right now. you know, and this is the way the rest of the country would have looked, neil, if it weren't for the fact that fracking has really changed the world as we know it. right now, you are paying $22 per million metric btu. the rest of the country, henry hub, you are 360. it shows what a major impact that has had. bottom line here, when you heat with heating oil, a new high for the year and to be honest with you, that fuel is being phased out. natu
-year career in international security and arms control and energy security, but this gun control thing is a really tough issue, and it's tough because it's emotional. what the nra has done is to make it even more emotional by bringing in ancillary arguments about the elite and how well-protected they are, suggesting everyone else is not. i felt i had to sort of depart from my normal activities and write something about this, because first of all, presidential children and grandchildren who have protection are in a very different category than ordinary kids, regrettably. they are an extension of the president himself and are targets. so, to suggest that the population as a whole is somehow similar to one of the obama children just isn't fair or right. >> you wrote in this "washington post" op-ed, which caught my eye, how lucky is it to grow up with a loss of privacy and freedom along with the psychological effects of a child shadowed by armed body guards. having secret service protection is part of the sacrifice presidential families make in the name of public service. those who have ha
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